Medicine is really harder than dentistry


Leave the archive and display this page in the standard design: Human vs Tooth




Love her,

Of course, human is clearly different from dentistry and vice versa.
But which course is harder on the bottom line? Which course has the better reputation, because it is more demanding etc?

Actually wrong forum, but my opinion:

Well-known wants to study dentistry. He said it would be more difficult to get a job at ZM. Because the costs are rising, the health insurances are less and less and a dentist (especially an orthodontist) is almost considered a cosmetic surgeon / doctor.

In medicine, in the clinic, you are paid according to TVÖ. Accordingly, you also earn less than a dentist. Unless you open your own practice.

In addition, some in this forum think that ZM is more difficult. I don't know what's right. I'm not studying yet: P

At ZM, you can buy an instrument case that costs quite a bit unused. KP how much, but at least 1000-2000 euros something. Hit me if it's wrong :-))

Bottom line: Do what you think is right and where you think you could enjoy it.

Yes, I can finally do something with the information :-))
I noticed that at universities the humanis look down on the teeth and vice versa: -nothing

But I can imagine that each study group looks down on the other.

Mathematician after physicist
Physicists to engineers
Engineers to historians

:-)) :-))

So I wouldn't make my decision dependent on that. If you are referring to the social prestige: I have the feeling that medical doctors are more respected. Childhood memories come up with dentists :-D But that's just my feeling and the prestige doesn't really matter, right?

What is more difficult you can't tell me with 100 percent probability ... but once I found / saw a statistic on which various courses of study were assessed according to their degree of difficulty ...

at the top there was dentistry (i.e. the most difficult subject), followed by vetmed and pharmacy (both place 2) ... then there were a few other subjects (something with business / computer science / math or something) ...
human medicine was in 5th or 6th place ....

The ZM course is one year shorter, you do the Physikum after the 5th semester and you do not need to take some courses (preclinical) that are compulsory for Humanis or you do not need to take an exam.
It's a far more expensive course than medicine, but I don't think you can really say it's harder or easier. Some have to "work" more during their studies and others have to cram more. Among the humanis, however, one notices an aversion to Zahnis.
Because figures show that Zahnis earn far better than human medicine and can sometimes finish at 8:00 p.m. As a dentist, you need to have a certain business acumen and be able to persuade patients from time to time. Of course, as a dentist you are not as diverse as you are as a human. In addition, it is easier for a physician to go abroad than for a dentist.

When it comes to reputation, I have found that medical professionals have a better reputation - especially among academics. I have Zahnis in the family, so I can't let anyone show anything;)

What is more difficult you can't tell me with 100 percent probability ... but once I found / saw a statistic on which various courses of study were assessed according to their degree of difficulty ...

at the top there was dentistry (i.e. the most difficult subject), followed by vetmed and pharmacy (both place 2) ... then there were a few other subjects (something with business / computer science / maths or something) ...
human medicine was in 5th or 6th place ....

And what, please, did they measure that ??? * head shake *

The ZM course is one year shorter, you do the Physikum after the 5th semester and you do not need to take some courses (preclinical) that are compulsory for Humanis or you do not need to take an exam.
It's a far more expensive course than medicine, but I don't think you can really say it's harder or easier. Some have to "work" more during their studies and others have to learn more. Among the humanis, however, one notices an aversion to Zahnis.
Because figures show that Zahnis earn far better than human medicine and can sometimes finish at 8:00 p.m. As a dentist, you have to have a certain business acumen and be able to persuade patients from time to time. Of course, as a dentist you are not as diverse as you are as a human. In addition, it is easier for a physician to go abroad than for a dentist.

When it comes to reputation, I have found that medical professionals have a better reputation - especially among academics. I have Zahnis in the family, so I can't let anyone show anything;)
No offense, please, but you just can't leave it that way.

Zahnis do write exams, it always depends on the university.

As for business acumen, I can tell you that both human and dental professionals will end up with no business acumen in the future. I always speak for a free practice here. It looks a little different in the clinic.

During and after your studies there is always a certain tension between the two factions. However, it always depends on the individual settings of the people concerned. There is also an extremely harmonious and "symbiotic" collaboration.

Whether the reputation of the respective occupation is better or worse also depends on the attitude of the individual.

And finally, a nice sentence that our old footballer Loddar Maddhäus could have said:
In general, I don't believe in generalizations.
;-)

greeting
hennessy

And what, please, did they measure that ??? * head shake *
I can't tell you exactly either ... I'll do my best to get the statistics up again ...;)

no offense, please, but you just can't leave it that way.

Zahnis do write exams, it always depends on the university.

As for business acumen, I can tell you that both human and dental professionals will end up with no business acumen in the future. I always speak for a free practice here. It looks a little different in the clinic.

During and after your studies there is always a certain tension between the two factions. However, it always depends on the individual settings of the people concerned. There is also an extremely harmonious and "symbiotic" collaboration.

Whether the reputation of the respective occupation is better or worse also depends on the attitude of the individual.

And finally, a nice sentence that our old footballer Loddar Maddhäus could have said:
In general, I don't believe in generalizations.
;-)

greeting
hennessy

Zahnis also write exams, have I written something else? ;-)

Well, whether in the future humanis will also have to develop a business acumen, I doubt something. At least not in the way the teeth need to be. In addition, dentists are now businessmen / women.

Furthermore, I have nothing against Zahnis, I just write down what I see. It's just the case that human medicine has a better reputation ... I don't want to judge now whether rightly or wrongly.

Zahnis also write exams, have I written something else? ;-)

Well, whether humanis will have to develop a business acumen in the future, I doubt something. At least not the way the teeth need to be. In addition, dentists are now businessmen / women.

Furthermore, I have nothing against Zahnis, I just write down what I see. The fact is that human medicine has a better reputation ... whether rightly or wrongly I don't want to judge now.
General practitioners do need to develop business acumen. It starts with the question of the branch office and continues with investments, leasing contracts, rental negotiations, personnel decisions, disposal contracts, material orders, etc. etc.
I have seen this every day for more than 10 years, as I have a lively "exchange of ideas" with my colleagues in human medicine. More and more non-contractual services are also being offered that are only partially related to the core competence of the individual subject.
So if you want to be successful in the long term, you have to be in a good mood not only professionally but also commercially.

I can confirm that, some large practices already have full-time managing directors today.
Simply because the commercial part of the entire work is so large. So self-employment will probably be nothing without a basic commercial understanding.

But that wasn't the initial question ;-)

General practitioners do need to develop business acumen. It starts with the question of the branch office and continues with investments, leasing contracts, rental negotiations, personnel decisions, disposal contracts, material orders, etc. etc.
I have seen this every day for more than 10 years, as I have a lively "exchange of ideas" with my colleagues in human medicine. More and more non-contractual services are also being offered that only have to do with the core competence of the individual subject to a limited extent.
So if you want to be successful in the long term, you have to be in a good mood not only professionally but also commercially.


No, but let's start with the trend. Most of the humanis end up in a hospital, most of the toothis in a practice.

No, but let's start with the trend. Most of the humanis end up in a hospital, most of the toothis in a practice.
sorry, but I also dare to doubt that. I think the resident physicians will be roughly the same as the clinicians.

However, to get back to the topic again:
One cannot generally say that one of the two subjects is more difficult than the other.
The general practitioners will enjoy a better reputation, since we Zahnis have the worse cards.

However, we have the more loyal patients because our fluctuation is probably not as high as in human medicine. However, this is only my assessment, 100% do not know.

And what, please, did they measure that ??? * head shake *

clearly in the manual effort ^^

As a human medicine one is just a real doctor, think that is the main difference: -wow

As a human medicine one is just a real doctor, think that is the main difference: -wow

Think bunny!
REAL doctors treat more than one species :-)) ;-)

Think bunny!
REAL doctors treat more than one species :-)) ;-)

Women and men are more than one species;)

my opinion:

I'd say that ZM is more difficult or more stressful (no, I haven't already studied both). E.g. we are currently making prostheses. Have finished the first arduous steps. If I make a gross mistake in the last steps (which could happen in the best of times), I would not be able to finish the exercise by the deadline (no, I am not slow, but am even within a good average) and would get out of it Fly course.
You are in the clinic every day from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and have to work concentrated and at the same time have to write the same exam as the doctors, although they had time to go to the lectures.
In addition, this is the highest level of fine work. So I can't think of a job where you need such good hand-eye coordination.

The amazing thing is that I ONLY have Tpk and chemistry (also bio, materials science). Later you have Phantom (supposed to be a thousand times heavier than TPK) and other natural sciences that are also a thousand times heavier.

Yes, the doctor has subjects that the Zahni does not have, but the reverse is also true Oo



The doctor clearly has a better reputation. When one hears that you are studying ZM, the general public almost assumes that your DN was probably not enough for HM. Often you even get to hear "hm yummy looking into smelly mouths all day long". So there are even people who mock this profession.

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