White supremacy is rooted in cowardice

Critical whiteness

Martina Tißberger uses a qualitative empirical study to analyze how contradictory relationships between racism and sexism affect psychotherapeutic and psychosocial work and how professionals deal with them. From the perspective of critical whiteness as a critique of epistemology and as a practice of hegemonic self-reflection, possibilities for psychology, but also for the entire social sciences, are shown how these power relations can be thwarted.

The content

What is racism

Ethnicity, culture, race construction

The racism of psychology and the psychology of racism

Intersectionality of gender and racism

Methodology and Epistemology Criticism

Critical whiteness as a practice of hegemonic self-reflection in psychotherapy and psychosocial work

The target groups

Lecturers and students in the social sciences (psychology, educational science, sociology, social work, pedagogy)

Psychologists, social workers and pedagogues

The author

Martina Tißberger is a professor in the Master’s degree in Social Work with a focus on interculturality at the Upper Austria University of Applied Sciences. She did her doctorate in psychology at the Free University of Berlin and has taught and researched at UC Berkeley, the Humboldt University of Berlin and the Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, among others.

Keywords

Qualitative Methods Subject Science Criticism of Epistemology Psychotherapy Counseling Postcolonial Criticism Decoloniality

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1st University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, LinzLinzAustria campus

About the authors

Martina Tißberger is a professor in the Master’s degree in Social Work with a focus on interculturality at the Upper Austria University of Applied Sciences. She did her doctorate in psychology at the Free University of Berlin and taught and researched at UC Berkeley, the Humboldt University of Berlin and the Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, among others.

Bibliographic information