Why was Bhagat Singh hanged

Bhagat Singh (* September 27, 1907 in Lyallpur, West Punjab, India [now in Pakistan]; * March 23, 1931 in Lahore [now in Pakistan]), revolutionary hero of the Indian independence movement.

Who Was Bhagat Singh?

Bhagat Singh was a hero of the Indian independence movement in the early 20th century. A vocal critic of British rule in India, he was involved in two high profile attacks on British authorities - one against a local police chief and one against the central legislative assembly in Delhi. He was executed for his crimes in 1931 at the age of 23.

Why is Bhagat Singh important?

Bhagat Singh was involved in two high profile conspiracies against British authorities in India that helped fuel the Indian independence movement. In 1928 he participated in a conspiracy to kill the police chief responsible for the death of the influential Indian writer and politician Lala Lajpat Rai. However, he and a co-conspirator mistakenly killed the police deputy superintendent JP Saunders, and Singh fled the city of Lahore (now in Pakistan) to avoid execution. In 1929, he and an accomplice dropped a bomb on the Central Legislative Assembly in Delhivor in protest of the Defense of India Act. While in prison, Singh helped organize a hunger strike to protest the mistreatment of prisoners. This demonstration earned him widespread support in India. Even so, he was hanged for Saunder's murder in 1931.

How did Bhagat Singh die?

In 1931 Bhagat Singh was hanged for the murder of officer JP Saunders in the city of Lahore (then in India). Saunders was mistakenly killed as part of a conspiracy to kill the police chief responsible for the death of Lala Lajpat Rai, an influential Indian writer and politician.

Bhagat Singh attended Dayanand Anglo Vedic High School run by Arya Samaj (a reform sect of modern Hinduism) and then the National College, both in Lahore. As a youth he began to protest against British rule in India and soon fought for national independence. He also worked as a writer and editor in Amritsar for Punjabi and Urdu language newspapers advocating Marxist theories. He is credited with popularizing the catchphrase “Inquilab zindabad” (“Long live the revolution”).

In 1928 Bhagat Singh and others planned to kill the police chief responsible for the death of Indian writer and politician Lala Lajpat Rai, one of the founders of the National College, during a silent march against the Simon Commission. Instead, in the event of a false identity, junior officer JP Saunders was killed and Bhagat Singh was forced to flee Lahore to escape the death penalty. In 1929, he and a staff member at the Central Legislative Assembly in Delhi dropped a bomb to protest the implementation of the Defense of India Act, and then surrendered. He was hanged for Saunders' murder at the age of 23.