What is knotted carpet

Carpet dictionary


A B C D E F G H I J K L M O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Afshar: The Afshari are originally a Turkish tribe whose name derives from a former sheik and were nomadic in the Mesopotamian region between the Euphrates and Tigris until the beginning of the 17th century. These were then later recorded by the Abbas Shah in Persia. The Afshari live as cattle breeders, semi-nomads or as settled farmers whose wives knot the carpets. Although production is falling sharply, the amount of goods in the Kerman and Shiraz markets is still significant.

The main focus of carpet production is in the mountain settlements around Sirjan, Shahr Babak, Dahaj, Nagriz and Estahbanat in the south. Foothills of the Zagros Mountains belonging to the Ostan Fars. The quantitatively most significant contingent comes from Sirjan, which is mainly created in the farmhouses.

Shahr Babak delivers a very fine product with figural drawings. The dahadj are mostly of an appealing originality. The Neyriz carpets are traded in Shiraz. The pattern of these carpets shows an ethnologically determined relationship to the Ghashghai in many of the pieces. This tribe shares with the Afshari and the Arabi in the wide area south of Shiraz.

Typical for the Afshari carpet are the extremely subtle sense of color and a great wealth of variation. In the foreground is a generous geometric division of the fields, filled with miniature, mostly boteh motifs.

Afschar Farsi Madan - Sumack kilim: This south Persian nomad tribe lives in the vicinity of Dehsajer Baft in summer and in Hozeluk near Baghat in the cold season. The women of the Farsi Madan are excellent knotters and weavers. About 200 families are still out and about with their tents. The Sumack kilims of this tribe that we import are among the finest kilim works that are only produced in small quantities today.

The Sumack kilim is a very time-consuming and durable handicraft using the technique of looping knotted wrapping. The pattern-giving yarn is passed over four warp threads on the visible side, then looped around two warp threads for binding on the reverse side, and then continued on the surface to give a pattern. A woolly, solid weft thread gives the fabric additional hold. As is customary with real nomad carpets, the weft and warp are also made of pure sheep's wool.

With normal use, this kilim will last just as long as a good knotted carpet. It is important to have a non-slip carpet underlay on a smooth floor.

A sure indication of the high durability is that there are still a great many and also very valuable antique (over 100 years old) Sumack kilims. It should be noted that the sumack kilims have nothing to do with the widespread woven kilims. Woven kilims are much easier to make and in a fraction of the labor time.

After the Ghadimi, the Afshar-Tabii and the Qashqai Spirit is that Afshar-Kamo the fourth project that our company implemented in Iran. The aim of this special kilim edition is to combine simple design and the best material to create a unique, contemporary and authentic nomad kilim.

Antique Persian village and nomad kilims from the 18th and 19th centuries serve as a template. It was again made in a small south-east Persian village, following the tradition of Persian folk art. The Afshari ethnic group, nomads and semi-nomads, weave this kilim without time pressure and with the best local sheep wool.

In contrast to the kilims from manufactories, no exact sample templates are used, this is the only way that each piece is truly unique and shows the unique and lively deviations in the design. The Kamo kilim is probably the most individual kilim edition currently available on the European market.

These nomad kilims are not as straight or precisely woven as the kilims from the large manufacturers, but it is precisely this fact that gives the nomad kilims their individuality and liveliness. The looms are still old wooden looms, some of which can be found in carpet museums.

Only the best highland sheep wool is used, which is carefully dyed with vegetable dyes. We also purchase these valuable materials ourselves, this is the only way to ensure consistently high quality at the best possible price. Weft and warp are also made from pure sheep's wool. The simple nomad patterns are particularly contemporary and give today's living ambience the finishing touch.

After the Ghadimi, the Bijar Novum, the Afshar Kamo and the Gashgai Spirit is that Afshar-Tabii Another project that Mesgarzadeh implemented in Iran. The aim of this extremely hard-wearing Sumack kilim is to revive old nomadic art in connection with above-average quality and the best material.

It is made in a small south-east Persian village, following the tradition of Persian folk art. Farmers and sedentary nomads produce this kilim with diligence and therefore without time pressure.

We only use high-quality, hand-spun sheep's wool, and it is precisely this noble wool material that makes the major difference to the usual sumack and suzanikelims, which are always made from machine wool. The hand-spun sheep's wool gives the Afschar-Tabii its unique beauty and outstanding quality

You can find more information about hand-spun sheep's wool at this link

The Sumack kilim is a very fine, time-consuming and durable handicraft using the technique of knotted wrapping. The pattern-giving yarn is passed over 4 warp threads on the visible side, then looped around 2 warp threads for binding on the reverse side, in order to then be patterned again on the surface. A woolly, solid weft thread gives the fabric additional hold. As is customary with real nomad carpets, the weft and warp are made of pure sheep's wool. The number of knots is between approx. 150,000 to approx. 200,000 knots per square meter and the carpet thickness is approx. 4-7 mm.

At our Afshar-Tabii the wool material is hand-spun and dyed with vegetable dyes. We also purchase these very valuable materials ourselves, this is the only way to ensure consistently high quality at the best possible price.

Under normal use, this extremely robust and knotted Sumack kilim lasts just as long as a very good knotted carpet. Although these particularly good Sumack kilims are very stiff and stable, a non-slip carpet underlay is recommended on a smooth floor. You can order these exactly from us at the same time.

A sure indication of the high durability is that there are still a great many (and also very valuable) antique (over 100 years old) Sumack kilims. It should also be noted that sumack kilims have nothing to do with the widespread woven kilims. Woven kilims are much easier to make and in a fraction of the labor time.

High-quality and durable stool made of real, South Persian kilims with natural colors and hand-spun sheep's wool, the top is made of an Afshar-Tabii-Sumack kilim, the 4 side parts are also made of real, hand-made Jahim-Kilims, the filling is made of light and dimensionally stable Plastic material, all parts sewn by hand.

The Sumack kilim is a very time-consuming and durable handicraft in the technique of looping. The pattern-giving yarn is passed over 4 warp threads on the visible side, then looped around 2 warp threads for binding on the back, in order to be patterned again on the surface. A woolly, solid weft thread gives the fabric additional hold.

Aliabad is the finest and best quality jalameh. Jalameh is a small village in western central Persia, near Essfahan. The Jalameh carpets are made here by Qashqai semi-nomads. These semi-nomads produce a very fine, high-quality and clear carpet. In this way, the design unfolds fully and clearly. Typical of the Aliabad is its joy of color without being obtrusive.

Royal blue, deep red and a subtle green are often used as color compositions. Usually squares or diamonds are used as the basic pattern. For larger formats, a basic pattern with three vertical hexagon medallions is often created.

Amalehbaft belong to the group of Rizbaft carpets and are actually a further development of the Gabbeh carpets, but with a very fine and dense weave. Amalehbaft therefore require a production time 2 to 3 times longer than normal Gabbeh carpets. The mystical treasure trove of old nomadic peoples is arranged in such a way that an almost modern visual effect is created.

These carpets are made in southern Persia, in the province of Fars. Most of these carpets are knotted by the Ghashgai nomads in the area around Shiraz. Only high-quality, hand-spun sheep's wool is used for the pile in our Amalehbafts. As is customary with real nomad carpets, the weft and warp are also made of pure sheep's wool.

You can find more information about hand-spun sheep's wool at this link

Keep your eyes open when buying carpets! Our South Persian carpets are high quality, genuine hand-knotted originals with a real Persian knot and NOT cheap woven handloom copies from India. Our Amalehbaft are much more time-consuming and of high quality hand-knotted like so-called -Indian handloom or -Indo loom carpets. Loom carpets are only woven and not knotted! With the same number of knots, our real hand-knotted carpets took 6 times longer to produce than so-called -Handloom carpets- from India. Apart from the fact that one cannot speak of real knots in the case of loom carpets, as these have no knots at all, only (cut) loops. The quality of our genuinely hand-knotted carpets is therefore incomparably higher. Wool and color are also of the highest quality. So-called -Handloom carpets- are simply woven in a simple, rapid process, WITHOUT knots. Furthermore, some online shops deliberately indicate a completely wrong and far too high number of nodes. Loom carpets have no knots at all!We therefore do not carry handloom carpets!

Ardebil is a (ancient name Atravat) city in Azerbaijan in the Sawelan Mountains. This city reached its heyday under the Safavids in the 16th and 17th centuries. The wool is medium-long in the pile and it is knotted medium-fine to fine. The fund is usually the same. Ardebil is a very good to very good utility carpet. Today's knotters pay great attention to precise patterning and exact knotting.

Bachtiar: The name comes from the time when the landlords of the area in which these carpets were knotted were Bakhtiars. The Bachtiar carpet is now made by local farmers in Hausfleiß, although it is often assumed that the Bachtiar carpet is a nomad carpet.

The main production of Bakhtiar is Shar-Kurd, which means City of the Kurds means. Further sub-provinces are Saman (two-shot ware), Babaheidar (one-shot ware), Chalshotor and Bibibaff (two-shot ware or multi-shot ware).

The Bakhtiar Armanibaff is made in the northern part of the actual Bakhtiar knotting area. Although it shows that Armenians have also taken a liking to these patterns, they are slowly dying out as a large part of the population emigrated to Russia, their original homeland.

The garden is the most dominant pattern in Bakhtiar. The carpet is divided into rectangular, sometimes checkerboard, square, diamond or other shaped fields. This gives the carpet a certain severity. In addition to the garden pattern, a medallion with corresponding corner gussets is generously laid out for the higher bakhtiar qualities.

Natural colors are preferred for this carpet, which, despite their intensity, have a pleasant effect and develop a beautiful patina over time. The colors brown, which is used for the outline drawing, are ideally suited, as are red, bottle green, yellow and white as brighteners that make the carpet appealing.

The term Belutch comes from the tribe of the baluchi. Today this genus is linked by other tribes. The most significant amount comes from Iran and Afghanistan. These carpets are produced in the house and partly by semi-nomads and nomads. Weft and warp are also often made of sheep's wool.

The distinctions, pattern and quality, can be determined ethologically for almost all pieces. On the whole, the trunks remain true to their patterns and color habits. When it comes to classification, a distinction is made between the Mashhad Belutch and the lighter and cheaper Herat or Afghan Beluch. In Mashhad, the Mashhad-Belutch is made by settled Belutch tribes.

These carpets are characterized by their extremely fine to very fine knotting and a razor-precise drawing. The finest and therefore the highest quality products come from Turbat. Very original and less finely crafted Belutch come from Sistan, which belongs to the Persian southern province.

Bergamo: The friendly, lively small town of Bergama is located inland on the Bakir Cay river, in western Anatolia in Turkey. Agriculture is practiced in the fertile valley. However, Bergama is famous under its ancient name Pergamon. The residence and fortress of the Pergamene Empire, which dates back to 280 BC. Founded in BC, it was one of the richest and most powerful countries in Asia Minor in its heyday.

Bidjar is a city in northwestern Iran, in Kordestan. The city lies at an altitude of 1920 meters and is also called the roof of Iran. The majority of the population are Kurds. The Bidjar is one of the most solid and high quality oriental carpets.

In the past, a distinction was often made in trade between Bidjars from Bidjar (knotted by Kurds) and those from Tekap (knotted by Afsharen). The two main production areas are in Kermanshah Province. The two groups differ in the strength of the weft thread used. In the Kurdish Bidjar, a particularly thick weft yarn, which is extremely hard, is struck. This creates a board-hard carpet. The Afshari-Bidjar has a thinner weft and is therefore less stiff.

Today a distinction is mainly made between the third qualities, the very good Sandjan, the two top qualities Bukan and Tekap, whereby Bukan is a little higher in quality. The Herati pattern, also known as the fish pattern, with and without a medallion, is typical of all Bidjar genera. This can range from very small to overly dominant. As a rule, a warm rust red is used here as the base color. There are also bidjar with floral patterns. The basic color blue is preferred for the Shah Abbas patterns. Beware of the cheapest offers, there are also many inferior bidjars on the market.

Bidjar-Gerus are an in-house development of the Loribaft carpets from southern Persia. For this, old, traditional nomad motifs are used very sparingly.

Only the highest quality, hand-spun Bidjar sheep's wool is used for the pile. Bidjar wool is probably the best carpet wool in the world. In addition, in our Bidjar-Gerus carpets, this wool is spun purely by hand and knotted purely by hand in a socially responsible manner.

This results in an incredibly high level of durability and durability of the carpets. Even the heaviest use is not a problem for this type of carpet. The pile is extremely dense and firm. These carpets are made in Northern Persia.

You can find more information about hand-spun sheep's wool at this link

Bijar novelty are an in-house development of the Kashkulibaft / Gabbeh / Amalehbaft / Rizbaft carpets from southern Persia. With these unique pieces from Northern Persia, the mystical treasure trove of old nomadic peoples is arranged in such a way that a modern visual effect is created.

Within this carpet group, Bidjar novelties are qualitative -State of the Art-. Only the highest quality, hand-spun Bidjar sheep's wool is used for the pile. Bidjar wool is probably the best carpet wool in the world and, in contrast to most other wool qualities, has virtually no wool abrasion. Therefore there is no fluff on the carpet. In addition, with our Bidjar-Novum carpets, this wool is spun purely by hand and knotted purely by hand in a socially responsible manner.

This results in an incredibly high level of durability and durability of the carpets. Even the heaviest loads are no problem at all for this type of carpet. The pile is extremely dense and firm. These carpets are knotted according to old tradition in the rural province of Kurdestan in western Persia. The knotting time is extremely long and is up to 3 months per square meter! The working time for a 3 x 2 m large Bidjar novelty is 18 months. And the longer the working hours, the higher the quality. Handcrafted originals, each piece is unique!

Read more about hand-spun sheep's wool.

Thus, a Bidjar novelty is qualitatively superior to any other modern carpet!



Keep your eyes open when buying carpets! Our Persian Bidjar Novum carpets are high quality, genuine hand-knotted originals with a genuine Persian knot and NOT cheap handloom copies from India, which are only woven. Our Bidjar novelties are much more time-consuming and high-quality hand-knotted like so-called -Indian handloom or -Indo loom carpets. With the same number of nodes, our real Bidjar novelties took 7 times longer to manufacture than so-called.-Handloom carpets- from India. Apart from the fact that one cannot speak of real knots in the case of loom carpets, as these have no knots at all, only (cut) loops. The quality is therefore incomparably higher. Wool and color are also of the highest quality. So-called -Handloom carpets- are made in a simple weaving process, WITHOUT a Persian knot. Furthermore, some online shops deliberately indicate a completely wrong and far too high number of nodes. We therefore do not carry handloom carpets!

Bokhara is an oasis city in Uzbekistan (the former Uzbek SSR) on the famous Silk Road. In the 19th century, this historically important city was the trading center of Central Asia. As far as is known, no carpets were knotted in Bokhara itself, but it is the namesake for whole groups of oriental carpets. These carpets were made by various Turkmen tribes in Persia, Gordon, Gonbad-i-Kavus and Afghanistan and are among the finest and most popular Central Asian carpets.

This also explains why many other countries, such as Pakistan, the Balkans and Turkey, copy this carpet. Correctly, however, the copies reproduced should also be designated as such, e.g. Pakistan-Bokhara. Typical of the Bochara is the even distribution of many small medallions, usually surrounded by a beautiful border.

The board hatch comes from western Persia. Technically, the knotting area is assigned to Hamadan, although it belongs to the administrative district of Arak. The main production is in the village of Kombazan.

Typical of the Bordschalu is its high-quality, full, usually above-average high pile, and its exemplary bright, rich floral design. A multi-pass rosette often forms the medallion, which stands on a sea of ​​flowers and blossoms. There are also beautiful vase patterns.

Derbent belongs to the Soviet Republic of Daghestan on the west bank of the Caspian Sea. Derbent was the capital of ancient Albania when it was conquered by Peter the Great in 1722. To protect the city, he built a 150 km long wall known as the Alexander Wall. The Derbent rug belongs to the Kaukasen family. A large star medallion is often placed in the middle field. The filling motif is worked out with small birds, dogs and asterisks. These carpets are made by Azerbaijan and Tatar women in the villages of the Derbent region. Derbent in Dagestan is the southernmost and at the same time the oldest large city in Russia. It is located on the southern edge of the Russian republic of Dagestan on the coast of the Caspian Sea. The name Derbent comes from Persian and means -Locked gate-

Djosan is a city in western Persia. It is located southeast of Hamadan and east of Malayer, here a carpet very similar to the Sarough is knotted. Most pieces of this type of carpet are dominated by a slim rhombus that is accompanied by floral motifs. A beautiful, tinted, lighter red and gold is predominant. The wool material is shiny and the knotting is very rich. Mainly the Djosan is traded in Hamadan and Tehran and belongs to the high quality Persians.

Djoshogan is a city in central Persia. During the Safavid period, carpets were knotted here for the court manufactories, which were among the best that have ever been produced. Their patterns are similar to the Herati carpets and the vase carpets. The double chain is typical of these carpets. Djoschogan is divided into three quality categories: Djoschogan, Mey-Mey and Mortschekort.

Djoschogan: basic quality
Mey-Mey: fine quality
Mortschekort: extra fine quality.

Therefore, one differentiates between these three carpets by their delicacy. Typical of these carpets are a mostly rust-red, dark or light blue or even cream background, interspersed with stylized flowers and blossoms. A diamond usually appears in the inner field. This gives the carpet a pleasantly strict, dedicated and, despite the sea of ​​flowers, an unadorned look.

The world famous city Essfahan lies in southwest Persia. This city has a fascinating past and was one of the richest and most magnificent cities in the world in the 17th century. Shah Abbas had the Majid-i-Shah built the royal mosque. With its breathtaking beauty, it is still considered the most beautiful and magnificent mosque in the world to this day.

Today in the traditional art school, students are referred to the paintings, faience and mosaic patterns of their ancestors. These strive to untangle the complicated interweaving and overlaying in order to work out new variations. Thanks to the well-organized factories, carpets that are splendid in terms of pattern and knotting technology are created as if from the heyday.

Essfahan is one of the most precious Persian carpets and has a fineness of up to 1 million knots per square meter. The Essfahan often consists of elaborate animal and hunting scenes. Volute goblets and elegantly drawn connecting tendrils are also very popular. The border is usually lined with slender lancet leaves based on Herat carpets.

We have been looking for a long time for a workshop that can tie state-of-the-art carpet design using the Persian knot. In Nepal this is impossible. Now we have found what we are looking for. The "Eterno" collection. Hand-knotted from first-class hand-carded sheep's wool (practically no wool abrasion and extremely hard-wearing), combined with shiny bamboo silk. Besides, bamboo silk is extremely climate-friendly and absolutely CO2-neutral. Bamboo absorbs 5 times more CO2 than a normal tree. The easy-care bamboo silk creates a beautifully shiny and durable texture when knotted. Our Eterno Collection combines retro design and vintage look in a completely new look. Excellent quality and top design at an unbeatable price.

Ferahan-Ziegler: Our Ferahans are so-called "Ziegler" carpets of a new and very high quality. Our bricks are made by hand in Afghanistan by experienced Turkmen knotters and are of significantly higher quality than pieces from Pakistan or India. This high quality Afghan quality is increasingly difficult to find as the well-known problems in Afghanistan severely hamper trade and manufacturing.

Where does the name Ziegler come from: In 1883 a Swiss named Ziegler founded an English import company called Ziegler & Co. in Manchester, England, and at the same time a carpet manufacturer in Sultanabad (now Arak), Iran. High-quality, patterned carpets in beautifully coordinated pastel colors in the style of the Mahal and Farahan were produced. The success was huge and Ziegler carpets became an international quality mark.

Well-preserved antique Ziegler carpets are now fetching record prices, especially in the USA. For several years now, these antique Ziegler designs have been knotted again in high quality. Unfortunately, there are currently a lot of inferior "brick" on the carpet market, which is only produced under the premise of being able to offer the "cheapest" price.

This Ferahan Ziegler is a qualitatively excellently processed piece, with excellent hand-spun Ghazni sheep wool of particularly high durability. Our Ferahan are knotted by Afghan Turkmens in a particularly fine and solid quality. The knot is layered, so a bump on the back is really a knot too. Simple bricks are often not knotted in layers, which means that only 2 cusps together result in a knot, which is why they are knotted twice more coarsely. The best brick carpets are knotted from hand-spun wool, which is dyed with vegetable dyes.

You can find more information about hand-spun sheep's wool at this link

The real Persian gabbeh is a high quality woolly and rather deep pile nomad rug from southern Persia, province of Fars. The originals are mainly knotted in the area around Shiraz by Ghashgai nomads and semi-nomads. The mystical treasure trove of old nomadic peoples is arranged in such a way that a very modern visual effect is created.

We ONLY offer our customers real Persian Gabbeh carpets!

Since good sheep's wool has become very expensive in the meantime, some knotters in the pile use cheaper hemp yarn in addition to sheep's wool. We only use pure new sheep's wool in our gabbe rugs.

Originally gabbehs were made for the personal use of the gas gainomads. This deep-pile carpet (about 15-25 mm) was probably used as a sleeping pad. Today these are part of the modern Persian carpets due to their simple pattern. Gabbeh are relatively coarse and thickly knotted carpets and have a large color scheme. Due to the high natural content of natural lanolin (wool fat), the Persian gabbeh has a pleasantly soft and natural shine.

But be careful! Please read the description texts for Gabbeh carpets (sometimes also called Gabbeh Kashkuli carpets) very carefully. Only those from Persia (= Iran) are of high quality and genuine. As soon as you read words like: India, Indo or Ind. In the description, these are copies from Indian carpet factories and not nomad carpets from Iran. When it comes to Indian gabbeh, don't be fooled by descriptions of nomads. There are no gas gain nomads in India!

ONLY Gabbeh copies come from India! With us you will only find real South Persian gabbeh And only with these high-quality originals is valuable hand-spun sheep's wool, which is dyed with natural colors, used in contrast to the Indian Gabbeh plagiarism.

Since the wool material, which is also used in the base fabric, is of unusually good quality, this carpet also has a high practical value. In contrast to the knots from India, the Persian gabbeh has almost no annoying wool rubbing off. The quality difference in wool material between genuine Persian and Indian knots is very large. Our real gabbehs don't fluff right from the start!

Conclusion: If words like: Ind. - Hand-tufted - Indo or Cotton or India Handloom or Loom appear in a carpet description, then these are not genuine originals from Persia.

Especially -India handloom- indicates a particularly fast and cheap weaving technique, which has nothing to do with the traditional and time-consuming Persian knotting technique and quality. Loom carpets are only woven and have no real knots!

The production time for a 5 square meter carpet in the quality -India Handloom Gabbeh- is approx. 3 weeks, the production time for a real hand-knotted Persian (= Iranian) gabbeh of the same size is approx. 20 weeks! Therefore 6 times longer and the quality of the originals from Iran is incomparably better.

Or to put it another way: In the time in which you knot a Persian 6 square meter gabbeh by hand (retail price approx. € 1500), you could also make 6 Indian handloom gabbehs with 24 square meters (retail price approx. € 4000). Thus, the price-performance ratio with a real Persian Gabbeh is much better.

So-called -Handloom carpets from India- are subject to the quality of an original from Persia (Iran) in every respect. Since we place the highest value on the best quality, we do NOT carry any so-called -Indian handloom carpets.

Be careful with very high knot numbers. Unfortunately, there are also dubious providers in Germany (e.g. in Hamburg) who shamelessly exaggerate the number of nodes or are simply dishonest. Gabbeh carpets are advertised with 120,000-300,000 knots per square meter, in fact these often only have 30,000-60,000 knots per square meter. Real gabbehs are rather coarse, thick carpets and usually have between 40,000 and 90,000 knots per square meter. The number of nodes per square meter is not the most important thing in a gabbeh. But information on quality simply has to be correct. Often these retailers only want to distract attention from poor wool quality with exaggerated knots.

The extra expenses for a real Persian gabbeh soon amortized due to the enormously higher practical value. Besides, the original is also the nicer carpet.

You can find more information about hand-spun sheep's wool at this link

Our quality classification for South Persian Gabbeh carpets is as follows:
BASIC QUALITY = standard quality
HIGH QUALITY = good standard quality
BEST QUALITY = very good wool quality and tight weave
SUPREME QUALITY = exceptionally good workmanship and wool quality, fine and very tightly knotted for a gabbeh. Is already referred to by some companies as Amaleh or Amalehbaft.

Keep your eyes open when buying Gabbeh! Our Persian Gabbeh is a high quality original from Persia (= Iran) and NOT a cheap handloom copy from India. Loom carpets are just woven and have no knots, just cut loops! Our Persian gabbehs are much more time-consuming and of high quality by hand than so-called -Indian handloom gabbehs. This real Persian Gabbeh takes 4 times longer to produce than a so-called -Handloom Gabbeh-. The quality is therefore incomparably higher. Also wool and color are only of the highest quality in genuine Iranian gabbeh. So-called -Handloom Gabbehs- are made in a simple, fast process, WITHOUT a Persian knot. Real Gabbeh carpets ONLY come from Iran (Persia)!

Be careful with very high knot numbers. Unfortunately, there are also dubious providers in Germany (e.g. in Hamburg) who shamelessly exaggerate the number of nodes or are simply dishonest. Gabbeh carpets are advertised with 120,000-300,000 knots per square meter, in fact these often only have 30,000-60,000 knots per square meter. Real gabbehs are rather coarse, thick carpets and usually have between 40,000 and 90,000 knots per square meter. The number of nodes per square meter is not the most important thing in a gabbeh. But information on quality just has to be right. Often these retailers only want to distract attention from poor wool quality with exaggerated knots.

Gabbeh-Loom carpets are a cheap, yet high-quality alternative to the knotted originals from Iran. Loom gabbehs are woven and not knotted and are therefore made much faster. They have a pile made from good New Zealand sheep's wool.

The Gabbeh-Sumack kilim is a nomad rug from southern Persia, Fars province. Most of these carpets are made in the vicinity of Shiraz by the Ghashgai nomads. Originally, Gabbeh was produced exclusively for the nomads' own use. Gabbeh kilims are very rarely found in the very robust and time-consuming Sumack technique.

Garadje is in the province of Azerbeidjan. Garadje is made here in a small village near Ahar, which is part of the Heriz knotting area. This village is well organized commercially and produces in its own way. The quality is very usable and of good wool. The uniform pattern type is typical for this carpet. The pattern consists of a central hexagon with two upright rectangles or squares on a red background. The rest of the free field is filled with stylized flowers and leaves. Leaf and flower motifs form a border in dark blue.

Qashqai are nomads from southern Iran from the Shiraz area. They belong to the Turkic peoples because they probably immigrated from the Caucasus in the 13th and 14th centuries. Their language is a Turkish dialect. They are considered to be the richest Persian nomads.

The large families of around 20 move from the north to the west in October and back to the north in April. Because of the transport, assembly and dismantling, the horizontal looms are limited in width. The exception are the sedentary Qashqais who knot larger carpets. The women do the dyeing and knotting. Kashkuli are mostly extremely fine pieces and come from a sub-tribe that has nomadized northwest of Shiraz and has also partly settled down.

The Qashqai is one of the finer, more valuable nomad carpets. Exact work and a rich pattern are typical of the Qashqai. The patterns are often arranged vertically and are based on three diamonds as the basic motif. The attractive scattered patterns consist of stylized flowers, points, leaves, birds and other animals as well as small geometric motifs. As is customary with real nomad carpets, the weft and warp are also made of pure sheep's wool.

The Ghadimi is the highlight of Mesgarzadeh's own productions. Experts and connoisseurs agree: Finally a carpet that is contemporary, but not fashionable, that is durable but not antiquated - zeitgeist and tradition rolled into one. The Ghadimi is a particularly high-quality rug from a small northern Persian farming village called Bachshayesch. It is made according to ancient Heriz, Serapi, and Bachshayesch patterns in Hausfleiß and entirely in keeping with Persian folk art. Each Ghadimi is unique and individually patterned. It is knotted without a precise template. In order to maintain the high quality standards, only about 60 pieces can be produced per year. Every piece is signed and numbered.

Only materials are used that were common before the invention of synthetic paint and machine wool and are also known from good antique carpets. Namely hand-spun sheep wool and natural colors. It is knotted without the knot hook that is otherwise common with almost all types of carpets, the wool threads are only knotted particularly tightly by hand. The production time is around 3 months per square meter, about as long as e.g.with a very fine Tabriz. The sheep wool is the best there is in Persia and is also known from the Bidjar carpet. But machine-spun in the bidjar and hand-spun in the ghadimi. Material usage approx. 9 kg / sqm. (before shearing), approx. twice to 3 times as much as with other carpets.

You can find more information about hand-spun sheep's wool at this link

Advantages of the particularly time-consuming knotting technique and the special sheep's wool quality:
The knot is much stronger and denser
The carpet is much more durable and less sensitive to dirt
The surface look is much nicer and stays that way over the long term

The Ghadimi novelty is a particularly high-quality carpet from a small northern Persian farming village called Bachshayesch. It is knotted without a precise template. In order to maintain the high quality standards, only about 80 pieces can be produced per year.

Only materials are used that were common before the invention of synthetic paint and machine wool and are also known from good antique carpets. Namely hand-spun sheep wool and natural colors. It is knotted without the metal hook that is otherwise common in almost all types of carpet, the wool threads are only knotted particularly tightly by hand. The production time is around 3 months per square meter, about as long as, for example, with a finer Essfahan. The sheep wool is the best there is in Persia and is also known from the Bidjar carpet. But machine-spun in the bidjar and hand-spun in the ghadimi. Material usage approx. 9 kg / sqm. (before shearing), approx. twice to 3 times as much as with other carpets.

You can find more information about hand-spun sheep's wool at this link

Advantages of the particularly time-consuming knotting technique and the special sheep's wool quality:
The knot is much stronger and denser
The carpet is extremely robust, durable and insensitive to dirt
The surface look is much nicer and stays that way over the long term

Uniquely beautiful and ultra-modern woven kilim from Afghanistan. Very harmonious play of colors, not bright and not pale. Exclusive to Mesgarzadeh only. On smooth floors (hard floors) we recommend our non-slip carpet underlay, in connection with the purchase of this kilim you will receive the appropriate non-slip underlay at a reduced price.

The Ghazghar woven kilim from the wild heart of Afghanistan is hand-woven in old nomad motifs according to an ancient tradition. A special feature of all slotted kilims is that with straight pattern sections the weft thread is reversed on exactly the same warp, so that a small slit is created in the fabric.

These rustic and down-to-earth kilims can be used on both sides. The color is wonderfully warm and earthy, not pale and not garish and fits perfectly into a contemporary and modern living environment. On smooth floors (hard floors) we recommend our non-slip carpet underlay. When ordering, please indicate in the comments field whether you would like to order a suitable carpet underlay.

The Ghazghar kilim pillows from the wild heart of Afghanistan is hand-woven in old nomad motifs according to an ancient tradition. A special feature of all slotted kilims is that with straight pattern sections the weft thread is reversed on exactly the same warp, so that a small slit is created in the fabric.

The color is wonderfully warm and earthy, not pale and not garish and fits perfectly into a contemporary and modern living environment.

Ghiassabad is a small village in Farahan County, Markazi Province. Unusually fine and rare carpets are produced here. These carpets are among the most valuable Iranian village carpets at all, but only if the fineness is over 300,000 knots per square meter. These carpets are often referred to as Sarough Ghiassabad. Although the village of Sarough is located in the district of Arak, province of Markazi and Sarough carpets usually have significantly fewer knots per square meter and are therefore thicker.

Qom is located in north-western central Iran and is the second most important pilgrimage city after Mashad. In 1220 Mongols devastated this city and 500 years later Qom was conquered by the Afghans. Thus the art of knotting carpets did not begin until the 1930s. Since this carpet could not build on its own pattern tradition, tried and tested patterns from other knotting areas were used. But slowly the Qom got its own character.

Qom is made of fine wool and often with or from silk. A light-ground background is usually preferred. An ivory colored ground and frequent use of light green can also be found, although the use of light green on Persian carpets is very rare. In addition to designs from other areas, Persian artists also take old patterns and incorporate their ideas. This is how uniquely beautiful and often extremely fine Qom carpets are created.

Goltuk: In the area around Zandjan in northwestern Iran, settled Kurds knot a carpet of similar quality to the bidjar in Zaronim (approx. 150 x 100 cm) and dozar formats (approx. 200 x 130 cm).

The special base fabric creates a hard and firm grip. The Goltuk is usually kept in dark colors. A slim hexagon usually dominates the inner field. The filling motifs are flowers, leaves and animals.



Hamadan is located in the middle of a well-watered fruit-growing area on the banks of the Qareh at the foot of the Zagros foothills in northwestern Iran. Carpets have been knotted in this city since ancient times. Hamedan is a collective name and carpets come from many of the following places on the market.

Some of these have retained their independence and treated their names independently or in connection with Hamedan. These are: Assad-Abad, Begardeh, Bibikabad, Bortschalu, Borudjerd, Darjazin, Endjilas, Godardjin, Hosseinabad, Kabudar-Ahang, Khamseh, Kangaver, Karagös, Lilian, Malayer, Maslaghan, Mehrbahn, Noberan, Saveh, Tafresh, Tuserkan, Zagheh , Zandjab and Zanjan. Semi-antique and antique Hamadan carpets, which can be found in private collections, are in great demand today. In private knotters' shops, market goods are produced in a wide variety of formats, which are also known as Sharabaff.

Turkmen tent carpet, which was used as a kind of curtain in the yurt (= nomad tent). The middle field, which is divided into 4 fields in a cross shape, is typical. Also called Engsi.

Real Hereke come exclusively from Turkey. Not from China or India or anywhere else. Always make sure that the country of origin Turkey is specified explicitly. If you only see the name "Hereke" or abbreviations such as "China", "CH", "C" or "CIN" or "Cine" or something similar, it is a matter of Chinese plagiarism. Copies from China are worth much less, often only a fraction of the original. Unfortunately, most of the Hereke sold to tourists in Turkey is made in China. Real Hereke are tightly knotted and therefore often have small irregularities in the knotting, Chinese counterfeits are often softer to the touch and mostly too perfect and too straight. Real Hereke are always made of Turkish bursa silk, which behaves differently than Chinese silk when it is knotted.

Tourists are often mercilessly ripped off in Turkey. Plagiarism is also very often falsely offered as "Hereke" on the Internet or on Ebay. The correct designation in the description, the invoice and in the certificate must be "Turkey Hereke".

Only buy from reliable sources! Only then does the real Turkish Hereke count among the most valuable and beautiful silk carpets of all.

Heriz: A city in northwest Iran in the Azerbaijan Province. Heriz is a collective name for the entire knotting area, especially around the city of Heriz, including the following localities: Ahar, Bakhshayes, Goravan and Heriz. All these carpets have the same characteristics in terms of pattern and weave. The warp and weft are made of thick cotton and the pile thread is made of two-ply and very robust sheep's wool. Most of the provinces produce the carpets with medallions.

Heriz carpets are very popular on the market because of their very good durability, classic patterns and mostly relatively low prices (with the exception of old and antique pieces, these are getting higher and higher). Typical for the Heriz are the shiny wool and the bright colors, which result in a fantastic coloring. The carpet is famous for its beautiful geometric design.

Hossenabad: A city in northwest Iran. The Hossenabad is knotted in the area of ​​Tuserkan and not, like almost all other Persian carpets, in the place of the same name. This rug belongs to the Hamaden family. Because of its good, durable material and its relatively cheap price, the demand at Hossenabad in Hamedan is very high.

The pattern is similar to the Herati pattern. Often a diamond-shaped medallion appears that interrupts the continuous design. However, this medallion is visually balanced by corresponding corner gussets. A deep red is almost always used as the basic color of the field.



Jalameh is a small village in western central Persia, near Essfahan. The Jalameh carpets are made here by Ghashgai semi-nomads. These semi-nomads produce a fine and clear carpet. In this way, the design unfolds fully and clearly. Typical of the Jalameh is its colorfulness.

Royal blue, deep red and a subtle green are often used as color compositions. Usually squares or diamonds are used as the basic pattern. For larger formats, a basic pattern with three vertical hexagon medallions is often created. As is customary with real nomad carpets, the weft and warp are also made of pure sheep's wool.

Kashkuli: A sub-tribe of the Qashqai are the Kashkuli. They also belong to the Turkic people and speak a Turkish dialect. The carpets are made by the Kashkuli on a lying loom with Turkish knots. The finely knotted nomad carpets of this tribe have always belonged to the highest quality Persian carpets.

Only the best mountain sheep wool (rarely expensive cork wool) is selected for the Kashkuli, which is predominantly colored with vegetable dyes. The compositions of red and gold-colored tones predominate in the Kashkuli carpets. With small ornaments, without constricting field corners and often of poignant naivety, every Kashkuli rug is an ambassador of the genuine nomad culture.

The town Kashmar is located in eastern Persia in the province of Khorassan and is the capital of the district of the same name. In the 12th to 14th centuries, Kashmar was a rich and important city known by the name of Turschis. When the Mongols sacked Turschis, this city did not recover.

Shah Reza Pahlavi later promoted turschis and renamed them Kashmar. Typical of the Kashmar carpet is the tightly drawn, slender rhombus, which separates the two-tone inner surface from one another in a richly contrasting manner. Everything is framed by a very distinctive main border. The wool is good to very good and the cord is medium high.

Cashmere belong to the group of Rizbaft carpets and are actually the high-end variant of Gabbeh carpets with extremely fine and dense knotting. Kashulibafts therefore require a production time 4 to 7 times longer than normal Gabbeh carpets. The mystical treasure trove of old nomadic peoples is arranged in such a way that an almost modern visual effect is created.

These carpets are made in southern Persia, in the area around the Zagros Mountains, in the province of Fars. Most of these carpets are knotted in the area around Shiraz by the Ghashgai and Lurinomads. Only high-quality, hand-spun sheep's wool is used for the pile of our Kashkulibafts. As is customary with real nomad carpets, the weft and warp are also made of pure sheep's wool.

You can find more information about hand-spun sheep's wool at this link

Keep your eyes open when buying carpets! Our South Persian carpets are high-quality, genuine hand-knotted originals with a real Persian knot and NOT cheap handloom copies from India, which are merely woven. Our Kashkulibaft are much more time-consuming and of high quality hand-knotted like so-called -Indian handloom or -Indo loom carpets. With the same number of knots, our carpets took 6 times longer to produce than so-called handloom carpets from India. Apart from the fact that one cannot speak of real knots in the case of loom carpets, as these have no knots at all, only (cut) loops. The quality is therefore incomparably higher. Wool and color are also of the highest quality. So-called -Handloom carpets- are made in a simple weaving process, WITHOUT a Persian knot. Furthermore, some online shops deliberately indicate a completely wrong and far too high number of nodes. We therefore do not carry handloom carpets!